The PASSE System – How to Take Action

Updated: 3/10/18 9:00am

The PASSE system was voted in by our legislature last year, and now the time has come for us to see the changes.

If you need a reminder, the PASSE stands for Provider-led Shared Savings Entity, and they will be managing the care for tiers 2 & 3 of behavioral health and developmental disability services.

DHS has begun to assign people to the 4 licensed PASSEs after each person’s Independent Assessment is complete.

MSL is actively working to get you more information on the PASSEs themselves. The information we have so far is listed below. If you have a question, you can call the DHS PASSE expert in your area. See the list.

These changes may be happening to you or a loved one, but you can do these 7 things to help yourself in this new process:

1. Make sure your provider knows about the PASSE and everything it involves.

Update: DHS said this week that they are in the process of setting reimbursement rates for providers – the actuary process. Because of that, some providers will not know what you mean when you mention the PASSE to them. Their business office may know and may be waiting on these rates before making any decisions. However, you can still take this information to your provider and/or to the business office.

The top 2 packets are ones that DHS has distributed to providers. Don’t assume yours has received it. Every provider you use needs to be sure they understand this. The 3rd is a collection of contact information of all PASSEs specifically for providers to help them join. Take care of yourself, and take these to every provider you see.

  • Resource that was sent to PCPs
  • Resource that explains PASSEs in depth
  • Resource that explains how to join
  • Give them the contact information below

Some have been concerned whether ACH is covered. This is the response:

“State supported hospitals UAMS and ACH will be enrolled with every PASSE. Many doctors are enrolled through their networks but may not know that yet. You can call every PASSE and interview them so you are making an informed choice.”

2. Get to know the PASSEs.

*MSL has requested websites for all – check back for updates.

Arkansas Total Care
Summit (Arkansas Provider Coalition)
  • Gateway Healthplan
  • Their HANDBOOK (rules, your rights, and information)
  • Network Provider Directory
  • Michael McCabe
  • 400 West Capitol Avenue, Suite 1700 | Little Rock, AR 72201
  • 1-855-544-8744

3. Join a PASSE Advisory Committee.

Every PASSE must have a committee of individuals and caregivers affected by the PASSE to give them feedback on what’s truly happening, especially if that doesn’t match what’s supposed to be happening. Use the contact info above to send your request to join a council.

4. Remember, you have choices.

Once you have been assigned a PASSE, you have 90 days to change to another. Call your PASSE, and make sure they include your providers. If they don’t, use the info above to find a PASSE that better suits you. We will continue to provide more info as we can!

5. If you feel lost, take some time to catch up.

What is a PASSE? Will you be affected? MSL has been following the PASSE from the very beginning. Take some time to catch up and read all about them.

6. Keep MSL informed.

If you learn anything, especially from a specific PASSE, share it with us! If you have any problems, MSL works to solve those for you. Please let us know by:

7. Think about how you’re feeling now, remember that at the next vote.

Our legislature voted this into effect. We called, we emailed, and we visited – all to let them know what we need. If you feel that this good for you, remember that, and perhaps send a note to let them know. You might want to vote for your representatives again. If you feel they didn’t listen to you or didn’t represent you well by voting for this, you should send them a letter to let them know. However, you also have the power to change who is in office. Make sure you place an informed vote. See how your local Representatives or Senators voted on Act 775.

H.R. 620 – Should you take action?

The Disability community is calling far and wide for people to take action against H.R. 620, saying that it is a bill that “fundamentally weakens the protections of the American with Disabilities Act.” Here are some resources to help you determine if it affects you or someone you love, as well as resources to help you to take action!

Does this affect you or someone you love?

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Take action!

A link originally shared by Disability Rights Arkansas gives these tips:

“Please contact your House Representative(and others from your state) and encourage them to stay strong in their opposition to H.R.620 and any “notice and cure” bill, as a rollback of civil rights. SAVE THE ADA!

  • Go to Contacting Congress using your zip code to find out how to reach your House representative via e-mail, phone, Facebook, Twitter, fax, etc.
  • Call your Representative using the U.S. Capitol Switchboard at (202) 224-3121. They will help you find your Representative’s name, and switch you to their office. If you know your Representative’s name, you can use the House of Representatives phone list.
Sample Script:

“Hello, my name is [your name]. I’m a constituent from [your state], zip code [your zip code]. I am opposed to H.R. 620 and any change to the equal access protections of the Americans with Disabilities Act. I strongly encourage Representative [add last name] to oppose any reform efforts. Thank you.”

Reasons To Oppose H.R.620:
  • H.R. 620 would weaken the civil rights of people with disabilities, making it harder for us to use the same restrooms, shop at the same department stores, and eat at the same restaurants as our non-disabled friends, family members, and peers.
  • Disability rights are civil rights. The ADA is a civil rights law. H.R. 620 would not only roll back important parts of the ADA, it would pose risks for other civil rights laws as well (such as Title II of the Civil Rights Act of 1964, which bars public accommodations such as hotels, restaurants, and entertainment venues from discriminating based on race; Title III of the ADA was based on this law).
  • H.R. 620 would not solve the problems its supporters are claiming it would fix. It would not stop fraudulent lawsuits. State courts and state bar associations are already equipped to address those problems, in better ways, without denying anyone equal access, or their civil rights. They have been successfully shutting down those bad practices in many areas.” More info

How to make sure Congress is listening to you.

Tax Reform Bill: How to Contact AR Senators

Watch the video above to get all of the contact information to get contact information and tips.

Other helpful links:

Are you thankful for Medicaid?

Author: Lainey Morrow, Medicaid Saves Lives’ Founder

It’s customary this time of year to count our blessings, and there’s one in particular that millions of Americans shouldn’t forget: Medicaid. 

If you’re a recipient (or know a recipient), think for a second what your life would be like without Medicaid.

My little girl qualifies for TEFRA because of her diagnosis, and she’s thriving because Medicaid gives her treatments like therapy and medicines that we simply can’t afford. Medicaid not only helps her day-to-day, but it’s also giving her a future where she may someday be able to live on her own and provide for herself. Because of Medicaid, she can climb stairs, say that she wants a drink, draw a line, feed herself with a spoon, and sit quietly with other students around a table. When I think of life without Medicaid, I see many who would be crushed under personal debt and suffering without hope.

If you’re thankful for Medicaid, please tell those who make our state and national policies, especially if you need to continue receiving it.

This is the perfect time of year to let our lawmakers know that we’re thankful for Medicaid. Why? Because it’s improving and even saving lives! I ask you to take a moment, and write your elected officials a note. Even better, include a photo. Tell them why Medicaid is important to you. If writing several is overwhelming, just start with one. 

You can also post on social media about why Medicaid is important to you using the hashtag #thankful4Medicaid to help others see why Medicaid is so important.

We need to tell everyone the great things that Medicaid does and who it helps. People need to hear this positive message. By sending notes, calling, and posting on social media, we are clearly communicating that we still need Medicaid, and we’re directly asking the people in charge to continue funding Medicaid for us.

Let’s flood our government with letters and calls this holiday season!

Arkansas Only

Contact any elected official in the US!

Public Comment Help – PASSE Model Phase I

DHS has released a manual/rule change for public comment until August 11, 2017. After that, you will not be able to get your comments on the record. In addition, they are hosting a public hearing on August 8.

You should read the manual for yourself to make sure you cover everything that concerns you. However, even if you read it, you might still wonder what to say. The comments below are an example of what one person plans to send in.

Use the form below. By choosing “Submit,” you will send an email directly to the appropriate DHS representative. Enter your information, and type your comments into the text box. You may copy/paste the comments listed at bottom into the comment section of the form, but don’t do so unless you have read it first and agree with it all. The following comments are just examples of one person’s opinions. Public comments are most effective when you make them more personal to you!


This is my public comment regarding PASSE-New-17up.doc:

Section 211.000 – It says that the PASSEs should begin October 1, 2017. I believe that this model is not ready to begin taking on clients for several reasons. Rules like this one still have to be sent through the legislature for their approval. The Insurance Department isn’t supposed to approve the PASSEs until mid-September, which will only leave them a couple of weeks before they start managing people’s care. We don’t know what the rules will be, and we don’t know who the PASSEs will be. If the PASSEs aren’t ready and don’t do a good job, they could make mistakes. This will hurt people. I want DHS to push the date back and allow us to keep things the way they are until the PASSEs have had adequate time to review all of the finalized rules and to hire and train people who understand the rules.

Section 214.000 – It says that people can choose another PASSE during the first 90 days and once every year. How will we know what the differences between each PASSE is? I want to pick the best PASSE, but I don’t understand all of the rules or what they all offer. (At this point, I have reason to wonder if the PASSEs themselves understand the rules, as they have not been finalized.) It also says “on the beneficiary’s annual anniversary of attribution to a PASSE.” Is this a single day to respond, or is it a week? You need to define how long that amount of time would be.

Section 214.000 D – It says a client can move because of “poor quality of care,” but how do we prove that? That is a relative term. Who determines what kind of care is poor? I believe that the patient should determine whether care is poor and what that means in their situation.

Section 215.000 – What if the abeyance is due to DHS/Medicaid’s fault in paperwork (and the client can prove that)? Will the coordinator help the recipient to know that their Medicaid eligibility is in dispute and help them to figure that out?

Section 222.000 G – “The right to be provided written notice of a change in the beneficiaries care coordination” should be at least 14 days, not 7 days. If you are relying on snail mail, half of the time can be used simply in sending the notification, leaving the receiver very little time to respond or make other arrangements. Why isn’t this policy the same as 223.000 B, allowing 30 days from the time it goes into effect?

Section 231.000 – The travel times and distances listed need to be cut in half, especially for DD and BH providers who are seen on a more frequent basis. For example, it is not in the best interest of a child or adult to have to travel an hour to and then an hour to return from a location to see a therapist multiple times per week.

Section 241 G, 242 A, & 243.000 – DHS needs to give the PASSEs enough money to have a qualified individual available to help me whenever I need them, as many times as I may need them. Many providers seem to be concerned that the amount announced at the AR Waiver Conference (in July 2017) of $177 is not enough. I want them to get what they need so they can give me what I need. After December 31, 2018, they should have a different funding source and should not use any money from recipients’ care for administrative funding needs.

Section 242.000 – It says in the document that care coordinators will be employees of the PASSE (241 B). However, it does not say where the care coordinators should be located. Because Arkansas is so rural, care coordinators located in the communities they serve would be most knowledgeable for their clients.

Section 254.000 – Will DHS be required to submit the data received from PASSEs, such as data that shows savings or lack thereof, for public viewing? We want to see that data as well.

Section 261.000 – This says that grievances must be resolved within 30 days of the filing date. What will happen in the meantime? If a person needs treatment, do they have to wait all that time to receive it?

Section 264.000 – This description needs more definition. Who may serve on a Consumer Advisory Council? I believe that beneficiaries or direct consumers should serve, but caregivers who speak in place of beneficiaries who can’t speak for themselves should also be able to serve.

Friends Don’t Let Friends Go Without Health Care

Author: Lainey Morrow, MSL Founder & parent


We’re all struggling, aren’t we? We can’t very well handle someone else’s bills probably, but there are fairly easy things we can do. One very sad thing I frequently encounter is the suffering of individuals when great resources exist to prevent such a thing. Sometimes it might be a person whose health is suffering, while for others it may be a suffering future due to delays in development.

As a matter of fact, I have experienced this myself. For 2 years, my husband and I struggled to provide for my daughter. We went into debt, staying awake many nights with worry, and she went without necessary services. We thought we were on our own. We thought we’d been denied for the only things that were out there. We worked as hard as we could, and still it wasn’t enough.

By the time she was 2, my daughter was very developmentally delayed. We didn’t find out about resources we could have accessed until we moved to another state. My friend told me about TEFRA, and my daughter was easily accepted. It makes me sick to think of all she went without simply because we didn’t know this immense resource was available to us. All I needed was someone to tell me about it, which is why that’s a huge mission of MSL – to pass along important information and to connect people with great resources that exist out there.

Someone from another state recently asked me what resources exist for them, so I started to look into it. What if you don’t qualify for Medicaid? TEFRA is an option that only certain states provide, but how do you know if it’s available in your state? If TEFRA isn’t available or you don’t qualify, then what?

Let no one go without, so here’s all my research for you to share.

Do you qualify for Medicaid?

Ways to qualify for Medicaid.

Where to start if denied.

Which states have TEFRA? (This is a specific type of Medicaid usually for kids with disabilities under 19, usually requiring families who make too much to pay a premium.)

If your state doesn’t have TEFRA or you don’t qualify, what are the other options:


Like I said, I didn’t find out about something my daughter desperately needed until another parent told me about it. Two long years, and we could have gone more.

We can’t help everyone, but we can help someone. Someone helped me. Keep your eyes open. You may not need a resource, but someone in your friends list might. If you see a good resource, share it! It just takes a few clicks. Charities are out there to be used. They want to help people who truly need help. Sometimes they just need a little free publicity to connect with the people who need them.

This is just a start. If you know of any great resources, especially ones that apply to all states, please send them to me to share!


Opportunity to Advocate – AR Congressional Forum

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Remember, we have done some training on social media and how it is a powerful tool to help you advocate for yourself and others. This is a big chance for you. All 4 of Arkansas’ Representatives voted for the AHCA, which would lead to Medicaid cuts. On July 27, KARK will help us to talk with them. We can send questions ahead of time using the hashtag #YourVoiceAR.

Here are some ideas to send to them. Add a picture for more emphasis if you wish. Copy/paste the text into your own post.

You all voted for cuts to Medicaid, and if that happens I will die. Don’t you care? #YourVoiceAR

You all voted for cuts to Medicaid. If that happens my I will lose __________. Don’t you care about me?

You all voted for cuts to Medicaid. If that happens my ________ will lose __________. Don’t you care about ___________?

Take Action: Graphic to Share

The news changes like the wind. Are they voting or aren’t they? Repeal and replace or repeal without replace? No matter what’s happening with them, we need to continue to make our needs and wants abundantly clear.

Many are saying that they can’t get through to Senators via phone calls. Don’t stop calling because they are counting the calls. 866-426-2631

However, social media is a great way to publicly contact your Senators, especially since they won’t post their direct email addresses.

Share this graphic with them and tag them in your posts. Use hash tags like #BCRA or #ProtectOurCare to help others see your posts!